Stress – The Silent Killer

Stress is something we are so used to taking that we think it is no big deal.

Do you remember the story of the proverbial frog in the pot on a stove? The poor guy does not realize that the temperature is rising because he is busy swimming around. By the time he realizes that the water has reached the boiling point, the frog is at the point of no return and ends up dying.

Why did I narrate this story?

Well… I have recently learned that undue amount of stress for a stretch of time is unhealthy. The frog is the story-equivalent of every human being. We are so used to taking stress professionally, personally and socially that we do not realize that we are burning out and one day BAM!!! We fall ill.

I am not suggesting that we like taking stress OR that we must live absolutely stress-free… No! That would be impractical. Stress is the by-product of too much work, expectations, frustration and too less of rest.

Studies have shown that constant exposure to stress results in long-lasting psychological and physical health issues. So, unless we learn to manage, it is going to consume us and we then become an ‘albatross around the neck’ for the family and dear ones.

In the current world scenario, stress is bound to happen, no one lives stress-free… it is all about managing it successfully, and that makes the difference.

Symptoms

How do we recognize stress? Here are some of the most common symptoms. However, it is advisable to keep in mind that each of us reacts to stress in a different way.

  1. Difficulty sleeping OR Excessive sleeping
  2. Weight gain or weight loss
  3. Body aches
  4. Irritability
  5. Panic attacks
  6. Headaches and fatigue
  7. Difficulty concentrating
  8. Heartburn and Nausea
  9. Social isolation
  10. Feeling overwhelmed
  11. Rash behaviors
  12. Depression
  13. Hair loss
  14. Infertility
  15. Inconsistent blood sugar and pressure levels

As individuals we need to understand that though there are people around us to support us, we need to be aware that we need help. Few things that have to come from introspection are

  • Recognizing that there is a problem and we need a solution
  • Recognizing the stress triggers and sources
  • Making self-care and me-time a priority
  • Get professional help if the need arise

 

Some simple yet effective methods as per study are as follows:

We can reduce our stress levels by laughing. Having a chuckle, lowers the stress hormones, including cortisol, epinephrine, and adrenaline, and strengthens our immune system by releasing positive hormones (Wallenstein, 2003).

Dark chocolate has also been found to reduce our stress hormones (Wallenstein, 2003).

As per Time.com [http://time.com/4728315/science-says-pet-good-for-mental-health/] having a pet and interacting with them reduces blood pressure and stress level along with depression. (This one is personally tested too… I cannot remain angry or sad for too long because of my 2 canine companions).

Taking a break from the monotony of daily mundane life is essential to prevent fatigue and that feeling of overwhelming. Read the entire article here

Lastly, meditation and deep breaths are known to do the trick over a period of time.

Ample rest, eating healthy and meditation can help control the unbearable stress that weighs down men and women of all ages today. However, if you begin to think that it is becoming a bit much, then please seek professional help before it gets out of hand.

Stay well dear readers!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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